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superverse.com 2013-02-22T19:42:16Z http://superverse.com/feed/atom/ JohnnyTiki <![CDATA[John Taddeo Interviewed By Jason Berek-Lewis]]> http://superverse.com/?p=6653 2013-02-22T19:42:16Z 2013-02-22T19:40:13Z Jason Berek-Lewis: John, thanks for taking the time to speak with Industrial Evolution. To read the original post on Broken Frontier Click Here John: Cool, thanks for having me.  I’m actually a fan of your column.  I read it whenever I see the next installment online, so I’m psyched to be a part of one. [...]

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Team ZoomJason Berek-Lewis: John, thanks for taking the time to speak with Industrial Evolution.

To read the original post on Broken Frontier Click Here

John: Cool, thanks for having me.  I’m actually a fan of your column.  I read it whenever I see the next installment online, so I’m psyched to be a part of one.

Jason: How did the whole Superverse and Zoom Suit venture come about?

John: The Superverse venture  . . . that’s so funny.  I guess because I bid on CrossGen and Valiant, some people think I have this massive company.  Our company, and I use the term company loosely , is me and a few friends that decided to get together on this animated short film idea that I had kicking around in my head. The comic sort of grew out of my love for comics and disappointment over the Valiant thing not working out.  I was excited to work with Bob Layton on an X-O Manowar limited series, so I definitely had comics on the brain. While the Valiant deal was souring, Zoom Suit was killing it at festivals.  We won “Best Animation” right out of the box at the Palm Beach International Film Festival.  From there it kept getting accepted to festivals and kept doing very well, so I decided to stop waiting around for the suits to finish bickering over nonsense and just move forward with the Zoom Suit comic.

Jason: From where did the inspiration come for the story and the characters involved?

John: I was about 10 or 12 and I saw Bob Layton’s layout on Iron Man #117, the one where Tony is jumping from the S.H.I.E.L.D. heli-carrier trying to put on the Iron Man suit before he hits the ground.

I remember seeing it and rushing to get the book open to see if Tony lives. I don’t want to ruin it for anyone, but it turns out that he did pull through.  Not to sound like a sadomasochistic, nutjob, serial killer twelve-year-old, but I was a bit disappointed about his success, because I wondered who would find the Iron Man armor. Who would be the next Iron Man?

So I wrote this Iron Man story where a kid found the armor.  He was all bouncing around inside and couldn’t really control it right.  Twenty years later, here we are.

zoom-suit-series-1-issue-2-Bart-Keron-covers-glow-in-the-dark-examplesJason: Can you fill us in on what Zoom Suit is all about and who the key players are?

John: Simon Bane is a turncoat NSA agent who steals the suit and Myles Mason is the kid that finds it, but the main character is the suit itself . On the surface, it’s a Charlie Brown, “Ugly Duckling” type story, but as you read carefully, you’ll find a unique departure from the usual superhero tale. The waters run deeper than they appear.

Remember, at first glance everyone wrote off Zoom Suit , because they thought Simon was going to become your typical anti-hero guy in a supersuit. You know the type: “He’s a bad guy, but beats up worse guys.” We put the first three minutes of the short film online and ended it with Simon in the air about to don the Zoom Suit.  Quite a few people e-mailed me or posted the typical “rip off,” “we don’t need more tech books,” etc.

Then on April Fools Day we released the second half . . .where the suit didn’t fit Simon.

It was found by Myles who has no idea how to use it.  I was impressed by how stand up some folks were to call or write me and say, “Dude, you got me with that Zoom Suit thing, I thought it was going to suck. Good twist, man.”  Even Scott Hinze mentioned in an interview on Fanboy Radio that he loved the twist.

That’s the flavor for the whole series.  You can try to expect the unexpected, but even our twists have twists.  So only the most astute reader will put together the clues and know where the story is going.  Plus, I think comic fans are going to get a kick out of the visual and written inside jokes, and pop culture gags.  It’s a fun read.

Jason: It seems to me that this is a story about adventure and discovery, and a tale that draws on some of the more archetypical aspects of storytelling. Care to comment about this?

John:  It is, but for both Myles and the reader.  The reader has as much to discover as our new hero, probably more!

I love comics where extra stuff is developing in the background as you go along.  For example, the entire black costume thing in Spider-Man was awesome, the clues that lead to Venom (Web Of Spider-man #18 and Amazing Spider-Man #298-300), then the clues that lead to Carnage (Amazing Spider-Man #344 & 345, 359 & 360).  It’s so cool when you can go back and say, “ah . . .there it is, how did I miss that?” or when you know it’s going to happen, but when?

I plotted 13 issues before writing issues #1-4, so there are clues dropped in issue #1 that may not rear their heads until a second or even third limited series.

Zoom-Suit-3-two-covers-a-tucci-b-bdpJason: For a comic that is still some time away from debut, you have put an enormous amount of effort into promoting Zoom Suit . How did your work with Marvel influence this approach? What have been some of your strategies for getting the book out there?

John: Marvel will always be a big influence, and before that I sold comics at shows and owned a small shop while in college, so that helped too.  I’ve also been reading comics for over 30 years.  Man, you’re bringing up my Marvel days, you’re going to bring a tear to my eye here.  My favorite job ever.

Alright, enough being a wuss, I’ll tell you my simple three step strategy.

Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
We didn’t start talking about the first book until it was completely finished.  Issue #3 is nearly finished and #4 will be complete well before #1 ships .

Be polite, friendly and professional in all circumstances.
In simple terms, if you’re a tool, why would anyone want to help you?  Be yourself, but be a pro, too.  Like the way you would act with your friends (unless you’re a dick with them, then don’t do that).

Do what you say you’re going to do.
Basically, under promise and over perform .  Things work out better for everyone when a retailer and customer truly believe that they got more than they expected.  If you don’t have a clue, don’t try to hide it because we’ll know. Comic people know their hobby up and down.

zoom-suit-issue-4-two-covers-bob-bdp-Jason: So any secret you want to spill about the extra “over perform”?

John: That’s it huh?  Just straight up, “Gimme scoop?”

Jason: Basically.

John: The 36 story pages, 2 letters pages and a comedy ad page for $2.95 isn’t enough?

Jason: Not if I can squeeze more out of you.  Spill it, Taddeo!

John:  I love straight shooters, so here you go.  Zoom Suit #1 is MetalFX from cover to cover.  Everywhere you see the Zoom Suit , it is presented in millions of metallic colors.  To get that effect throughout the entire book and keep the price at $2.95, it took a four-company partnership in three countries and two continents.  In exchange for the use of our images and animation in their advertising and promotion, MetalFX supplied their inks, software and production expertise.  Then Datachrome stepped in with a staccato printing process that features more than twice the resolution you see in a normal comic. But you can’t run this stuff on cheap paper, so Coast Paper Turgeon, also out of Canada, stepped in and upgraded all the paper.  The cover on Zoom Suit is 14 point, which is heavier than most trading cards!

The effect is sick. This is like reading comics in IMAX or Hi-Def.  Some folks involved in the process have referred to Zoom Suit as the world’s first “Super Premium” comic.  Hopefully fans will agree that the story lives up to the production values.

ZoomSuit2Preview2Jason: What has been the response from fans?

John: Response has been overwhelming.  I’ve been at fests where we received standing ovations.  One festival promoter asked me if I could tell her son what happens next, because he can’t sleep at night thinking about it.  We’ve won “Grand Festival” awards, “Best in Show,” and numerous “Best Animation” awards.  It’s surreal. I’m psyched.

We put out an offer for free trading cards on Broken Frontier a few months ago.  We figured we would make 1,000 sets and give them out over like two or three months, and in the meantime come up with the next promo item . . .48 hours later . . . GONE!

In just 48 hours, we had allocated all 1,000 sets.  Then by the end of the week, we had another 1,000 requests.  Diana [the Zoom Suit editor] was like, “I’m not going to have to lick a thousand envelopes alone, am I?”

Now I can’t stand it when people run out of stuff that I request.  I remembered I got beat like that all the time as a kid: “while supplies last” crap.  It pisses me off.  There was this submarine that you put baking soda in that I sent away for, and I got a crummy sorry letter and like a pack of Kool Aid.  That just really annoys me.

So I went back to press with a second set, and finally the third which we give out now.  We didn’t limit the third though.  To date, we have given out to fans or sent to retailers over 200,000 cards, about 50,000 to 60,000 sets.  Oh, and I must have signed at least 100,000 of those. Still no word on the baking soda sub though.

Jason: What type of fan would Zoom Suit appeal to?

John: I wrote Zoom Suit as if I was writing it for my friends, and we’re all comic geeks.  So I’d probably say Zoom Suit is for anyone who loves superhero comics.  If you’re into comics well enough that you can geek out with me and the best of them, you’ll dig Zoom .

Jason: You seem to have a specific vision for Zoom Suit , who have been some of the artists you have collaborated with for this project?

John: On covers for the limited series, Bob Layton, Bart Sears, Gene Colan and Jim Starlin.  Mostly the guys that did real famous tech or armor stuff, and Bill Tucci did a piece of Zoom art for me personally for helping him color the last Shi limited series.  I loved it so much, I asked him if I could use it as a cover.  He likes the book, so he dug the idea.

Inside the book, I think Billy Dallas Patton and I worked real well together, and now Keron Grant is onboard too.  I only met Keron a few months ago, but we talk a few times a week and seem to hit it off real well.  Both those guys will be major stars in the comic industry within the next five years.  No doubt.

ZOOM SUIT_Volume_1_Issue_1_Armored_Legends_CollectionJason: Zoom Suit has a very unique design element to it. Is this something you specifically had in mind when you created the concept, or is it something that has evolved over time when working with the artists for this series?

John: I wanted Zoom Suit to have its own style in many ways.  The character designs, camera angles, shot choices, page layouts in the comics and more.  I actually write panel by panel, and I’m very specific.  I paste pictures into the script for example camera angles and reference scenes from films.  However, I’m not a tyrant about my ideas.  Billy and Keron have both called me with great ideas for pages, and I’m always quick to jump at a great idea that advances the story.  I’m not into that “pride of authorship” thing.  Comics, TV, film, these are all collaborative efforts.  Sure, someone has to break the ties and I have to be that guy, but I’m not a tool about it.

Jason: Zoom Suit is branching out into other media outside of comics. What is involved, and where can people see this work?

John: It’s already been in over 50 film festivals, and it’s accepted to quite a few more already.  It was just accepted to the MegaCon Indy Film Expo, plus I’ll be at MegaCon with Bob Layton and the rest of the guys from Team Zoom, oh, and we’ll have the Zoom Suit there too, the one that the guys from Nightmare Armor made.  It’s cool. Come by, take a picture, and check out the flick on the big screen.

Jason: Will there be other Zoom Suit products such as collectibles or toys?

John: I’ve been approached for licensing for a few items already, but what I really want to do at this point is have a good time and write a cool comic.  I’m not very interested in making money.  So far we’ve given whatever prizes we receive to the Humane Society  (except the trophies and plaques and stuff – I keep those).  I don’t think so.  Unless it’s something very unique, or for charity, then I would do it.  Just to make a collectable toy or something now, I don’t think so.  The comic is the focus.

zoom shaks handJason: I believe that Zoom Suit is a limited series at the moment. Are there any plans for further Zoom Suit stories once the first story is told?

John: Right now there’s a full 13-episode television season plotted and eight episodes completely written.  Zoom Suit is very well planned out.  There are characters in issue #1 that seem in the background.  Some stay back there, others . . .well, you’ll see.

You have no idea the things this suit can do, and neither does Myles. Only difference is, he finds out the hard way.

zoom-suit-boothJason: Can you tell me a little more about Superverse?

John: Superverse will never be a large publisher with a dozen books.  It’s just me and some friends.  I might help out a friend on something I really like, but I don’t see myself as a publisher.  I’m just a guy writing a comic because he digs comics.

Jason: But what about other properties you will be producing? I am particularly interested in how you acquired the rights to America: Super Power .

John: Yeah, there’s that.  I own the artwork and all the rights associated with the art including to publish it in any manner and some other stuff, too.  It’s approximately 20 pages of art including a few covers.  The name American Power is owned by Disney, along with two scripts that were written for the series.  I think they were a zero issue and a number one.  My title, America: Superpower, would have nothing to do with the aforementioned scripts or name American Power .

The original idea for American Power came to CrossGen from Buddy Saunders, the owner of Lone Star Comics .  We spoke about his ideas for the book, and those were the best that I’ve heard.  If I recall, I felt the scripts that I had read were a bit of a departure from the original vision – not necessarily bad, just different.  If I ever did do anything with it, I would probably call Buddy again and start there.  Right now, it’s far off.

Lithograph_Volume_1_Armored Legends_SetJason: Where can we find out more about Zoom Suit and Superverse? When will the book be available?

John: Zoom Suit is in the February issue of Previews for April shipping.  However, I should warn fellow fans of an interesting dilemma that has developed.  Because of the high end printing and “cover to cover” metal, we wanted to give retailers a copy of the actual book with the order form, so they could see and feel it first hand before committing.

To do this, I made the unorthodox decision to print before getting any indication of orders.  Needless to say, our print run was small (it’s already printed), and Zoom Suit has gotten far more attention than I think anyone ever expected.

So I’m giving IE readers the heads up.  If you want a copy of Zoom Suit , best bet is to let your comic shop know right away.

Jason: Thanks, John!

Click here for more information on Zoom Suit.

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JohnnyTiki <![CDATA[Alternate Reality: Complete List of Zoom Suit Series 1 Issue #1 Variant Editions]]> http://superverse.com/?p=6353 2013-02-21T02:16:55Z 2012-02-29T15:10:01Z ZOOM SUIT #1 Comic Shop Edition A, B, C Comic Shops received Zoom Suit #1 with three different covers.  Cover “A” by Billy Tucci (center), Cover “B” by Billy Dallas Patton (left) and Cover “C” by Iron Man Superstar Bob Layton.  Initial orders topped 20,000 copies, with reorders over 7,000 copies* and over 10,000 copies [...]

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ZOOM SUIT #1 Comic Shop Edition A, B, C
Comic Shops received Zoom Suit #1 with three different covers.  Cover “A” by Billy Tucci (center), Cover “B” by Billy Dallas Patton (left) and Cover “C” by Iron Man Superstar Bob Layton.  Initial orders topped 20,000 copies, with reorders over 7,000 copies* and over 10,000 copies sold via the Superverse Direct Shop and at Trade shows.  Because the book was printed ahead of time, as opposed to “print to order” like other comic books, this edition was allocated.  Retailers received 90% of their initial orders.

(*Books planned for Film Festivals and Trade Shows were diverted in time to meet reorders, but not initial orders.)

TEAM ZOOM EDITION
This edition is 3X as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  The cover features the artwork of comic book Superstar Billy Tucci presented with the TEAM ZOOM logo across the bottom, and a unique back cover and interior covers.  This edition was only available as a preview book to selected comic shops.  Read more about it here.

BOB LAYTON ARMORED LEGEND EDITION.
This edition is 10 X as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  The cover features the artwork of comic book Legend Bob Layton.  This edition was a retailer incentive.  Comic shops could purchase 1  BOB LAYTON ARMORED LEGEND EDITION for every 10 copies they purchased of the standard edition.  Read more about the Armored Legends Collection Here.

BART SEARS ARMORED LEGEND EDITION.
This edition is 20 X as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  .  The cover features the artwork of comic book Legend BART SEARS.  This edition was a retailer incentive.  Comic shops could purchase 1 BART SEARS ARMORED LEGEND EDITION for every 20 copies they purchased of the standard edition.  Read more about the Armored Legends Collection Here.

GENE COLAN ARMORED LEGEND EDITION
This edition is 20 X as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  The cover features the artwork of comic book Legend GENE COLAN.  This edition was a retailer incentive.  Comic shops could purchase 1 GENE COLAN ARMORED LEGEND EDITION for every 30 copies they purchased of the standard edition.  Read more about the Armored Legends Collection Here.

JIM STARLIN ARMORED LEGEND EDITION
This edition is 50 X as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  The cover features the artwork of comic book Legend JIM STARLIN.  This edition was a retailer incentive.  Comic shops could purchase 1 JIM STARLIN ARMORED LEGEND EDITION for every 50 copies they purchased of the standard edition.  Read more about the Armored Legends Collection Here.

SUSPENDED ANIMATION EDITION
This edition is 3X as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  .  The cover features the artwork of Jorge Palacios, the chief animator on the Award Winning animated short. Highly sought after by fans of the animation, the ZOOM SUIT SUSPENDED ANIMATION EDITION is only available at Film Festivals and at the Superverse Direct Store.  Read More About It Here.

FILM FESTIVAL METAL EDITION
This edition is twice as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  The cover features the artwork of comic book Superstar Billy Dallas Patton in full MetalFX.  This edition is only available at selected film festivals and at the Superverse Direct Store.  Read More About It Here.

FILM FESTIVAL EDITION
This edition is 10 X as rare as the standard Zoom Suit comic.  The cover features the artwork of comic book Superstar Billy Tucci presented in a movie poster format.  This edition was given away to fans of the Zoom Suit comic book for fanaticism “above and beyond” the call of duty.  It quickly became known as “The Friends & Family Edition.”  This is the Platinum Spider-Man of the bunch – only far more rare with less than 1,500 copies printed.  Many were autographed and personalized directly to the recipient.  Very Limited quantities may be available at the Superverse Direct Store.  Read More About It Here.

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JohnnyTiki <![CDATA[Zoom Suit’s Super Rare Editions]]> http://superverse.com/?p=6290 2012-02-29T04:22:55Z 2012-02-29T02:14:52Z These are the most challenging editions of the Zoom Suit comic to find and collect.  They were not offered for sale in Comic Shops, and were only available from the Superverse Direct Store, or by winning them in contests. Zoom Suit #1 Suspended Animation Edition Limited to 5,000 Cover by Zoom Suit Chief Animator Jorge [...]

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These are the most challenging editions of the Zoom Suit comic to find and collect.  They were not offered for sale in Comic Shops, and were only available from the Superverse Direct Store, or by winning them in contests.

Zoom Suit #1 Suspended Animation Edition
Limited to 5,000
Cover by Zoom Suit Chief Animator Jorge Palacios
Written by John Taddeo
Pencils by Billy Dallas Patton

The Suspended Animation #1 Limited Edition was a giveaway at film festivals in California, New York and Florida.  It is also available at the Superverse Direct Store.  It features an actual screen shot from the animated short. The entire issue is printed with the unique “Metal Effects” process.

Buy it here.

Zoom Suit #1 Film Festival Metal Edition
Cover by Billy Dallas Patton
Written by John Taddeo
Pencils by Billy Dallas Patton

The Film Festival Metal Edition was given away randomly at various film festivals around the country. The cover is printed with a unique “Film Festival Metal Edition” logo and the back features the many festivals that showcased the Zoom Suit award winning animated short! This edition was also used for charity giveaways and fundraisers.

Buy it here.

Zoom Suit #1 Film Festival Edition, AKA, MOVIE POSTER EDITION
Cover by Billy Tucci
Written by John Taddeo
Pencils by Billy Dallas Patton

The Film Festival Edition was designed in the tradition of classic movie posters, featuring the logo at the bottom.  It is by far the rarest of the rare Zoom Suit Limited Editions.  It was only given to family members of the creative team and fans that went above and beyond the call of duty for the Zoom Suit Project.  Copies of this edition have sold for as high as $2,200.  John donates all the money raised by this edition to animal charities.

This edition was an extremely short run of under 1,500 copies.  Most were personalized with thank you messages to company insiders or friends that worked on the project.

Buy it here.

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JohnnyTiki <![CDATA[Zoom Suit #1 TEAM ZOOM Edition Unprecedented Offer]]> http://superverse.com/?p=6283 2012-02-29T14:10:27Z 2012-02-29T01:44:18Z Zoom Suit #1 TEAM ZOOM Edition Limited to 5,000 Copies Cover by Bill Tucci Written by John Taddeo Pencils by Billy Dallas Patton It all started in February when retailers received a very special and unannounced gift with their February order catalog, a complete “Sample” edition of Zoom Suit #1!  This was an unprecedented offer [...]

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Zoom Suit #1 TEAM ZOOM Edition
Limited to 5,000 Copies
Cover by Bill Tucci
Written by John Taddeo
Pencils by Billy Dallas Patton

It all started in February when retailers received a very special and unannounced gift with their February order catalog, a complete “Sample” edition of Zoom Suit #1!  This was an unprecedented offer to comic shop retailers, who are often forced to place orders blindly – sometimes without even seeing cover art, or knowing the creative team!

Retailers could see, feel touch and smell (yes, smell – the Metal Effects ink has an oddly pleasing smell) Zoom Suit #1.

In addition to the amazing cover art by fan favorite artist Bill Tucci, the Team Zoom Edition featured “Metal FX” printing – from “Cover to Cover!”

Production Quality

Step 1

Another industry first, everywhere the Zoom Suit appeared in the comic it glistened with hundreds of thousands of fully metallic colors!  The patented MetalFX technique was spot applied to the cover as well as every single page in Zoom Suit #1.  The result was the alien Zoom Suit “Popped” off the page.

Step 2

The amazing MetalFX process lays down a “Spot” chrome, which is then covered with translucent Red, Yellow, Blue.  The result is millions of metallic colors – and the brilliant eye-popping look of the alien Zoom Suit in the worlds first Ultra-Premium Comic Book Zoom Suit #1.

 

Traditional vs. Staccato DPI

Zoom Suit also featured a 600 DPI (Dots Per Inch) “Staccato” printing process for a super high definition, HD TV look.  Most periodicals and all comics are printed in full 300 DPI.  The 600 DPI in Zoom Suit allowed for super clarity which enabled John Taddeo to fill the pages with tiny details, hidden messages, clues, gags and “Easter Eggs”.

Shiny objects and great cover art can catch a retailers eye, but it’s the story that keeps them coming back – and back they came!  The Team Zoom advance copy led to first issue orders that topped many “Sacred Cows” of comic fandom including Iron Man, Bat Man, Transformers, Star Wars and more!

Are you ready to experience Zoom Suit?  Click Here.

 

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JohnnyTiki <![CDATA[The Complete Zoom Suit Series One Armored Legends Collection]]> http://superverse.com/?p=6251 2012-02-29T05:12:12Z 2012-02-29T00:49:46Z Here’s a complete run down of the very collectable Zoom Suit Series 1 Armored Legends Limited Editions. The Armored Legends Collection Zoom Suit #1 included a “Retailers Incentive Offer.”  Retailers were rewarded with one of the rare Armored Legends retailer incentives based upon their initial order of Zoom Suit.  Zoom Suit #1 had four (4) [...]

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Here’s a complete run down of the very collectable Zoom Suit Series 1 Armored Legends Limited Editions.

The Armored Legends Collection

Zoom Suit #1 included a “Retailers Incentive Offer.”  Retailers were rewarded with one of the rare Armored Legends retailer incentives based upon their initial order of Zoom Suit.  Zoom Suit #1 had four (4) retailer incentive Issues.

Zoom Suit #1 ARMORED LEGEND EDITION BOB LAYTON

This is Bob Layton’s personal interpretation of bad guy SIMON BANE and was a 10-1 retailer incentive.  This means that comic shop retailers had to order 10 copies of Zoom Suit #1 to receive one copy of this tough to find edition.  Like the Zoom Suit #1 cover “C”, this issue “re-imagines” Bob’s famous Marvel Comics Iron Man #118.  However, it’s very different than the standard edition cover “C”, and easily recognizable.  The easiest way to tell Cover “C” from the Bob Layton Armored Legends Collection #1 is the bright blue coloring, retro trade dress, retro cover price.  Also Simon is wearing glasses in the standard cover “C” edition, while in the Armored Legends edition Simon has no glasses.  Of course, it’s also clearly labeled “ARMORED LEGEND” near the Zoom Suit Logo.  Buy It Here if it’s not sold out.

In 1978, with writing partner David Michelinie, Bob totally re-imagined Marvel’s Invincible Iron Man, transforming it into one of Marvel’s all-time best sellers. Bob’s work on the Iron Man story, “Demon in a Bottle” is considered a milestone in comic history and was recently voted as ‘one of the top 20 comic stories of all time. Numerous concepts and characters that Bob created are represented on the silver screen in the 2008 motion picture–Iron Man and the sequel- IRON MAN 2.


Zoom Suit #1 ARMORED LEGEND EDITION BART SEARS

Bart Sears’ homage to one of his most famous images, Valiant Comics X-O Man-O-War #14 (Which coincidentally was written by Bob Layton!) Bart’s cover re-creation features the Zoom Suit and Brittany in the 1992 Valiant Comics classic pose.  This edition was a 20-1 retailer incentive.  Retailers has to order 20 copies of Zoom Suit #1 in order to receive a single copy of this rare edition. It says ARMORED LEGEND near the Zoom Suit Logo and is a mostly pink and blue with green crackling energy from the hands of the Zoom Suit. At 20X AS RARE AS ZOOM SUIT #1, this is tough to get your hands on.  Check for availability here.

Bart Sears unique style and dynamic layouts have been featured in comics for every major imprint and many independent publishers for over 25 years. Highlights include critically acclaimed runs on DC Comics Justice League Europe and Legends of the Dark Knight, Valiant Coics X-O Manowar, Turok and Image Comics Violator.  Bart has taught at The Kubert School of Comic Book Art, and is the author of the well known monthly series Brutes and Babes that was featured in Wizard Magazine, as well as the How-To book ‘Drawing Powerful Comics: Volume One’ which has achieved a cult status.

Zoom Suit #1 ARMORED LEGEND EDITION GENE COLAN. 

Gene was the original cover artist on the silver age masterpiece, IRON MAN #1, which he recreated for this super scarce 25-1 retailer incentive.  Retailers received just a single copy of this edition for every 25 copies of Zoom Suit ordered.  It features classic silver age trade dress and the iconic 12 cent price from the early days of the Marvel Age of comic books.  The single big image of  Zoom on the deep blue background is a homage to Gene’s most famous work.  Clearly labeled ARMORED LEGEND near the Zoom Suit Logo, this is a very collectable and hard to source edition.  In 2001 Gene did the amazing Iron Man #1 cover recreation (pencils, inks, color) that you see pictured.  It was placed up for auction with an opening bid of $5000.00.

Gene Colan was an American comic book artist best known for his work for Marvel Comics, where his signature titles include the superhero series, Daredevil, the cult-hit satiric series Howard the Duck, and The Tomb of Dracula, considered one of comics’ classic horror series. He co-created the Falcon, the first African-American superhero in mainstream comics, and the non-costumed, supernatural African-American character Blade, which went on to star in the series of films starring Wesley Snipes.

Colan was inducted into the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2005.  Sadly, Gene passed away on June 23 of 2011. He will be missed.

Buy it here.

Zoom Suit #1 ARMORED LEGEND EDITION JIM STARLIN

Jim Starlin’s Zoom Suit cover is a homage to the iconic Iron Man #100.  Like its’ 70′s classic predecessor,  it features a single image of Myles in the Zoom Suit snapping a piece of steel.  The cover is all metallic silver.  This was a 50-1 retailer incentive! Retailers had to order 50 copies of Zoom Suit in order to receive a single copy of this extremely rare edition.  Like the other 3 ARMORED LEGENDS it also says ARMORED LEGEND near the Zoom Suit Logo.  It also features retro 70′s trade dress and the classic 70′s retro cover price.

Jim Starlin’s early work for Marvel included three issues of Iron Man, introducing the fan favorite character Thanos.  He was then given the chance to draw an issue (#25) of the “cosmic” title Captain Marvel. Starlin took over as plotter the following issue, and began developing an elaborate story arc – Thanos saga which remains a critical piece of the “Marvel Universe” continuity. Years later Jim would return to Iron Man to create one of the most famous covers on the series, Iron Man #100.

Buy it here.

 Zoom Suit #2 ARMORED LEGEND EDITION BOB LAYTON

As if the definitive Iron Man artist, Bob Layton’s, remarkable homage to Tales of Suspense #39 wasn’t enough – It Glows in the dark!  This was a 25 to 1 retailer incentive with the unannounced “Extra Feature” of the “Element 116″ glow in the dark cover.  The glow in the dark ink was barely perceptible until sundown, when fans and retailers alike began to chat about the strange glow.  The result was a rush to own this rare comic.  Additionally, Zoom Suit #2 is the rarest of the four issue limited series.   Because comic book retailers are forced to order their books two months in advance, they were caught short on all Zoom Suit #2 issues, were as they had time to bump up orders on issues #3 and #4.

The background utilized for this edition is an actual screen gran from the animated series, while the inset images and full body image of Zoom is a homage to Tales of Suspense #39 – the first appearance of Marvel Comic’s Iron Man.

Zoom Suit #3 ARMORED LEGEND EDITION BART SEARS

Zoom Suit’s Armored Legend Edition for issue #3 was a recreation of the most famous comic book cover of all time.  Considered the first true superhero comic book, Action Comics #1, published in June of 1938, features the first appearance of Superman.  This edition was a 25 to 1 retailer incentive.

Although most people don’t know, it was this very cover that allowed Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster to introduce Superman to the world.  Action Comics was started by publisher Jack Liebowitz, who would later say that selecting Superman to run in the comic was “pure accident” based upon deadline pressure and that he selected a “thrilling” cover, depicting a man lifting a car over his head.

Bart’s re-imagination depicts Zoom in the iconic superhero pose SPOILER WARNING: Although it’s not in issue #3 that Zoom lifts a car.  That happens in issue #2 when He hammers Simon Bane with the neighbors pride and joy.   The cover has been compared to Hercules Clubs the Hydra by Antonio del Pollaiolo.

Zoom Suit #4 ARMORED LEGEND EDITION BOB LAYTON

In the last Armored Legends Edition in Zoom Suit Series 1, Bob Layton captures the drama, action and excitement of his fan favorite, classic Marvel Comics Iron Man #131.  In the original, which featured Iron Man vs. the Hulk, we see the Hulk coming in for the killing blow, with what appears to be Iron Man down for the count.

The cars on the ship depict the battlefield for the penultimate battle of Technology vs. Technology, Zoom vs. Simon Bane and finally the real secret behind the Zoom Suit.  Like his original, Bob recaptures “the Moment” with foreboding shadow effects on the powerful X-80 Hunter Killer Robot.

Do You Want to Own a Complete Armored Legends Collection?  Click Here.

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JenS http://www.Superverse.com <![CDATA[Zoom Suit Mentioned in “InFocus” Magazine]]> http://johntaddeo.com/?p=1144 2013-01-17T16:47:42Z 2011-05-08T18:10:57Z Why do comic books rule the box office? The Original Post is Here. By Terry Cronin   Of course, there are many successful films these days that didn’t start off in the world of comic books. But if we take a close look at the box-office results over the last five years, each year we [...]

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Why do comic books rule the box office?

The Original Post is Here.

By Terry Cronin

 

Of course, there are many successful films these days that didn’t start off in the world of comic books. But if we take a close look at the box-office results over the last five years, each year we find that a comic based film is in the top ten. The only exception was 2009, which while dominated by genre films like Avatar, Harry Potter, Twilight, and Star Trek, it’s comic book blockbuster representative was X-men Origins:Wolverine which was only the 13th top grossing film of the year. In 2008, we had both The Dark Knight and Iron Man as the top two films respectively. Iron Man 2 finished out this year as the number 3 top grossing film of the year beaten only by Toy Story and Alice in Wonderland.

It’s certainly obvious that these comic book stories are appealing to a mass audience and making movie studios a bundle. What you might not know is that comic books and filmmaking have a very special relationship. They are based on a very similar idea on how to communicate called visual story-telling.

Words and pictures have been an effective method of communication since mankind learned to draw on cave walls and the Egyptians developed their pictographs.

In fact, most television and film productions utilize a method called storyboarding before shooting their project. A storyboard is basically a sketched out comic book version of the planned film. The process involves graphically organizing the film with a series of illustrations or images displayed in sequential order for the purpose of pre-visualizing a production. This helps with communication between the director and the DP and crew because everyone already knows how the shots should look. This process allows a higher level of communication between the filmmakers than just the written word.

So my point is that basically every film begins with the production of a storyboard which is really a comic book. Comics and film synergize and really can’t be separated.

I have heard disparaging remarks that Hollywood has no imagination left and that is why they plumb the supposed lower levels of entertainment like comic books and genres like science-fiction and horror but I would tell you that Hollywood makes its decisions for financial reasons, first and foremost, and then, with communication.

Certainly you don’t mess with success take a look at the buzz over AMC’s new comic-book based series “The Walking Dead“. Since some of the bigger block-busters have come from the world of comics, Hollywood is going to continue to seek out concepts and properties from the comic book universe.

But comic books allow readers to visualize the story based on the comic book artist’s illustrations and so communication between potential developers of the comic into a show are all talking about the same imagery. They are not re-imagining what a character looks like because they already know. They do not have to imagine what happens during the story because they’ve already seen it.

Some film producers have had the foresight to remain faithful to the source material and avoid making a cardinal mistake of alienating their built-in fanbase. Examples of these films include 300, The Watchmen, and The Dark Knight. The level of star power portraying these roles has improved as well with Robert Downey, Jr and Gwyneth Paltrow in Iron Man, and the unforgettable Heath Ledger as the Joker. Gone are the campy portrayals of silliness by Adam West, and even, Michael Keaton. Comic book movies are serious business.

As a comic book writer and aficionado, I know that there are great properties out there that would translate well into more Hollywood blockbusters. I don’t understand why comics such as Headlocked by Michael Kingston, Zoom Suit by John Taddeo, Powers by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Avon Oeming, and a plethora of other greats haven’t been picked up by studios looking to make a bundle.

Click here to view the embedded video.

The best news that I can predict is that as comic books continue to dominate the box-office and the television screen, we can look forward to some more great stories coming our way from the incredible comic book universe!

 

 

Terry Cronin is the creator and writer of the comic horror-adventure series Students of the Unusual

He is also the program chairman for the Melbourne Independent Filmmakers Festival and the Megacon Indi

Read the Original Post Here:

http://www.infocus-magazine.com/article/GuestEditorial/596/

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JenS http://www.Superverse.com <![CDATA[NEWSARAMA Says Zoom Suit is the Comic of the Year!]]> http://johntaddeo.com/?p=701 2012-02-27T19:35:15Z 2011-03-28T22:49:38Z NEWSARAMA Says Zoom Suit is the Comic of the Year! YOUR INDY WEEKLY: ZOOM SUIT #1 Newsarama Review By Ryan McLelland Zoom Suit #1 Superverse  April 2006  $2.95 Written by: John Taddeo Penciled by: Billy Dallas Patton Inked by: Kris Justice Website: http://superverse.com  Rating 4 stars (out of 4). Zoom Suit is easily the indy [...]

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NEWSARAMA Says Zoom Suit is the Comic of the Year!

YOUR INDY WEEKLY: ZOOM SUIT #1
Newsarama Review By Ryan McLelland

Zoom Suit #1
Superverse  April 2006  $2.95
Written by: John Taddeo
Penciled by: Billy Dallas Patton
Inked by: Kris Justice
Website: http://superverse.com 

Rating 4 stars (out of 4).

Zoom Suit is easily the indy comic of the year. It surely never aims low in its goals of sucking in the reader and the talent writer John Taddeo has assembled to help him with his book (like the guest covers penciled by greats like Jim Starlin, Billy Tucci, and Bart Sears) can quickly draw eyes at the comic store. The fact of the matter is while a story about a teenager gaining superpowers isn’t new; Zoom Suit brings to the table a youth with the wit of Peter Parker who finds Iron Man’s costume combined with humor and a multitude of pop culture references that will please any fanboy or Family Guy fanatic.

Aliens have crashed on Earth at Roswell and sixty years later what does the government have to show for it? If you said nothing then you are dead wrong because the government was able to acquire and study the suits the aliens had come to Earth in. However, after sixty years, the government is unable to duplicate the suit and make an army of alien suit guys. What’s next for Agent Simon Bane, the man who has been studying the suit? It should be to deliver the supersuit to the Pentagon but once the helicopter is boarded to Washington D.C., Bane decides on other plans. Bane jumps out of the helicopter and blows it up in the process. Falling to Earth he opens up the case he has with him and starts to put on the suit he has just stolen from the Government and do so before he becomes a pancake. As the wind blows by Bane puts on the first glove only to find out that the suit doesn’t actually fit him.

A couple thousand feet below Bane is Myles, your average poor kid living in New York City. It’s Halloween and Myles is the only kid who came as “himself.” The other costumed kids make fun of him as they rightly should and Myles watches the girl he likes walk off with Power Ranger and Wolverine. Myles is pissed and he wishes to himself for a costume. Why can’t he have a costume? CRY MYLES CRY! And then, out of nowhere, falls a supersuit into an alley. Of course Myles runs over and puts the suit right on only to find out this is no Halloween costume. Suddenly Myles is running over water, flying through the air, and saving some poor tenants stuck in a burning building.

Of course this is only the setup and the exact above story has been seen by hundreds of thousands thanks to a short cartoon film that has been accepted and won many film festivals across the country. Zoom Suit #1 helps bring the story to comic fans nationwide and does so with wickedly funny scripting by Taddeo and the incredible artwork of Mister Miracle’s Billy Dallas Patton. Patton’s artwork comes through with a great crispness that rivals the art on any of the big books from DC or Marvel (which is probably why he’s working over at DC now). The book feels indy in a way that the old Valiant Comics once did: exciting, fresh, and bringing something new to a story already told a dozen times. Nearly every page is filled with pop culture banter but does so without feeling overdone. As a matter of fact, as I read the book, I found myself quite proud each time I spotted a reference and knew where it was from. Call it the geek in me but I find that stuff kinda exciting.

I’m not quite sure where the mini-series is going or what to expect but this quick and easy origin story of the kid in the “Zoom Suit” was an amazing addition to my comic book collection, as it should be for any fan. It easily attains a perfect rating and I only hope that this great series continues on long after this first mini-series is over.

Have an indy comic you’d like reviewed? Contact Ryan at rdmclelland@hotmail.com!

 

 

 

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JenS http://www.Superverse.com <![CDATA[Broken Frontier Calls Zoom Suit, “Great, with a lot of Heart”]]> http://johntaddeo.com/?p=699 2013-02-22T19:15:05Z 2011-03-29T02:45:31Z Posted by Jason Berek Lewis on Feb 19, 2006 at www.BrokenFrontier.com Inspired by Iron Man, as much fun as Spider-Man, marketed with enough fervor to make Donald Trump blush, Zoom Suit #1 is a fun filled debut. I have been lucky enough to receive a copy of the Zoom Suit #1 Film Festival Edition, a [...]

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Posted by Jason Berek Lewis on Feb 19, 2006 at www.BrokenFrontier.com

Inspired by Iron Man, as much fun as Spider-Man, marketed with enough fervor to make Donald Trump blush, Zoom Suit #1 is a fun filled debut.

I have been lucky enough to receive a copy of the Zoom Suit #1 Film Festival Edition, a limited edition version of the comic that is zooming your way in just a few short months.

Zoom Suit is a quick-paced, light and fun read. A genre blender of intrigue, action, superheroics and ugly-duckling-turns-hero, the book leaves you with a big smile on your face. While the premise of an unlikely nerd becoming a superhero might sound overly familiar, Zoom Suit is unlike any comic you have ever seen or smelled before.

The first thing you are going to notice about Zoom Suit is its unique bouquet. The perfume comes from the MetalFX inks that have made sure that every time you see the Zoom Suit, it is presented in millions of metallic colors. The result is spectacular. The alien spacecraft, the Zoom Suit itself and the resulting hijinks leap off the page in a way that you have never seen before.

So, it looks like a winner, it sounds like a winner, and it definitely… ahhh…smells like a winner, so does it zoom across the line?

In the characters of Simon Bane, the rogue NSA agent; Myles, the down-on-his-luck kid who only wants to celebrate the fun of Halloween; and Brittany, Myles’ close friend, John Taddeo, series creator and writer, has come up with a cast you instantly identify with and care for. Yes, you even feel for Simon, despite him being the bad guy.

With the characters down pat, John weaves a story that kicks off with a bang in Roswell and twists, turns and zooms its way across decades to deliver the Zoom Suit and a whole new level of adventure to one lucky kid. Just how Myles comes to inherit the Zoom Suit is one of the great twists in John’s story. When added to a brisk pace and pop culture reference-laden script, it makes for a lot of fun.

Billy Dallas Patton delivers on the pencils, creating not only a unique look for the Iron Man-inspired costume, but expressive, richly detailed characters who look and act in perfect synch with the script. Kris Justice’s inks fully flesh out this work, adding depth and the perfect blends of warmth, menace and shadow when needed. With such a demanding story, and unique printing process, Wilson Ramos, Tom Chu and Jung Choi have risen to the challenge to provide a stunning kaleidoscope of color for a vibrant superhero tale.

As a measure of just how unique this book is, Diana Striker is credited for the book’s “Special Effects.”

This is a comic book fan’s comic book. The story zings with “in jokes” and pop culture gags which reflect not only the sense of fun behind this book, but the creators’ deep love for this storytelling genre. You can’t help but cheer for the book’s hero, and you can’t help but feel a twinge of jealousy over the fact that the Zoom Suit isn’t yours.

With a pretty strong opening that leaves plenty of questions unanswered, Zoom Suit is a great independent book with a lot of heart, a good sized dollop of fun and plenty of zoom for your buck.

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JenS http://www.Superverse.com <![CDATA[Zoom Suit #2 is Sold Out]]> http://johntaddeo.com/?p=695 2012-02-27T20:04:12Z 2011-03-29T02:37:35Z Zoom Suit #2 is sold out at the distributor and the publisher. “The animated short film led many new fans into comic shops”, said Zoom Suit Creator John Taddeo.  “Many shops sold out of issue #1 before the month was up, but with a very small print run, issue two will dry up much more [...]

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Zoom Suit #2 is sold out at the distributor and the publisher.

“The animated short film led many new fans into comic shops”, said Zoom Suit Creator John Taddeo.  “Many shops sold out of issue #1 before the month was up, but with a very small print run, issue two will dry up much more quickly”.

Due to Distributor order cutoff dates, comic shop retailers had to order issues #1, 2 and 3 before experiencing the strong retail sales on Zoom Suit #1.  Orders on Zoom Suit issue #2 through Diamond Comics were just over 6,000 copies.  However, within days of the release of issue 1, retailers ordered all of Diamonds remaining copies via advance reorders.  Once Diamond was sold out, retailers turned to Taddeo for additional copies to meet consumer demand.

“Luckily we printed extras to give out at film festivals”, said Taddeo.  Retailers began phoning me asking to increase orders a week or two ago.  I shipped my copies off as quickly as possible, and over the last four days I realized that we had shipped an additional 4,200 copies bringing total sales on the second issue to over 10,000 copies.”

Orders on the April 26th release of Zoom Suit #1 exceeded 20,000 copies, a demand of more than double order estimates of industry professionals and triple the expectation of the publisher.  The comic was allocated to direct market comic shops at 90% of initial orders, and quickly sold out in all but the most heavily stocked shops.

“It’s amazing how fans have taken to Zoom Suit”, said Taddeo.  “I printed nearly twice what the market ordered on issue #2 and yet sold out by the release date.  We sold over $10,000 worth of Zoom Suit special editions and merchandise since the release of issue #1 and additionally sold over $2,000 of ZS items to benefit the Florida Humane Society.  A sincere heartfelt thanks to everyone contributing to the unexpected success of Zoom Suit”.

ZOOM SUIT #2 (Shipped May 24th) features a story by John Taddeo, with covers by Bart Sears and Keron Grant.  The Interior is by Keron Grant and Billy Dallas Patton. Retailers also received a limited edition Armored Legends Edition by Bob Layton.

ZOOM SUIT #3 is complete. Superverse guarantees a delivery date of June 28th 2006.  Preorders are recommended.

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JenS http://www.Superverse.com <![CDATA[Silver bullet Says Zoom Suit is the COMIC OF THE DECADE]]> http://johntaddeo.com/?p=686 2013-01-17T16:40:16Z 2011-03-29T02:33:24Z Silver bullet Says COMIC OF THE DECADE Zoom Suit #2 Receives 5 Stars Zoom Suit #2 Posted: Thursday, June 29 By: Kevin Noel Olson Writer: John Taddeo Artists: Keron Grant Publisher: Superverse John Taddeo can really irk a guy. When you review a book, you should be able to find something wrong with it. It’s [...]

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Silver bullet Says COMIC OF THE DECADE

Zoom Suit #2 Receives 5 Stars

Zoom Suit #2

Posted: Thursday, June 29
By: Kevin Noel Olson

Writer: John Taddeo
Artists: Keron Grant

Publisher: Superverse

John Taddeo can really irk a guy. When you review a book, you should be able to find something wrong with it. It’s common practice, and it’s actually enjoyable, but John’s taken away all the fun of complaining with Zoom Suit #2. That’s enough of reason to complain right there. Come on John, do something wrong with this series so we’ll have something to complain about!

In this issue, Myles faces off against rogue agent Simon Bane who wants the suit. Oh yeah, Simon’s been experimented on by the government with alien DNA, making him a formidable opponent for a fourteen-year-old kid with an alien space suit he’s only had overnight and has little idea how to run yet. The ingenious suit also has a strange weakness, which Myles discovers at a most inopportune time. There’s lots of gunfire and car-throwing in this issue, not unlike an episode of Wife Swap on ABC.

John Taddeo has shown a deep appreciation and knowledge of pop comic-book culture, and makes so many appropriate references that the reader is left wondering where a reference cannot be found. There are references to everything from the 90s comic book glut to a Batman and Space Ghost combined reference to Mortal Combat. There’s even product-placement for the techno-rock band FALLZ who worked on the Zoom Suit animation’s soundtrack. These references do not detract from the book, but merely add to the enjoyment of it.

The book’s humor runs the gamut from subtle to blatant. Hilarious captions like, “Relax! It wasn’t a dream. That would be weak” break the fourth wall in an entertaining way before instantly bringing the reader back into suspension of disbelief. There’s even an in-story reference to artist Billy Dallas’ absence from the issue to work on Mister Miracle (Keron Grant covers for Billy, who returns for issue three).

The sentiment of Zoom Suit has the best feel of comics from the 70s and 80s, where humor was balanced nicely with serious action. Zoom Suit is shaping up as a perfect fit for people who would rather enjoy comics than brood over them. Zoom will without question show itself to be one of the finest comics of the decade. That’s reason enough to take away a bullet.

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